Sewing How To: Fabric Yo Yo

I love using fabric yo yo’s in projects, they are really versatile and they are great in projects on their own as well as being ideal for adding in extra detail and texture.

For some yo yo makes check out my yo yo rabbit tutorial.

Making a fabric yo yo:

Materials:

  • Paper.
  • Scissors.
  • Thread.
  • Needle.
  • Fabric.
  • Pencil.

Making the yo yo:

  • Draw out a circle on paper (an 8cm Size template will produce a 4cm size yo yo).
  • Cut out the circle.
  • Use the circle template to cut out a circle from the fabric – leaving a 0.5cm seam allowance.

  • Fold in the edge of the circle by 0.5 cm and sew around to secure.

  • Pull tight to form the yo yo.
  • Sew a few stitches to hold together.

Crochet How To Guide: Block Stitch

Perfect for blankets and looks great when used to make a cushion, block stitch can also be used for scarves, hats and loads more other crochet projects. You can use one colour for it all, alternate between two colours or even use a different colour every row.

I have some patterns which use this stitch including a ear warmer.

Block Stitch Tutorial:

Notes:

  • Change colour on last yo of the final stitch of the row.

Starting row:

For the first row you need to ch the length of stitches you require, and as the block stitch works in blocks of 3 you need to make sure your starting ch length is dividable by 3. Once you have your ch length add on 2 extra stitches (this creates the first stitch of the row).

For example: if your starting ch was 18ch stitches long, add an extra 2stitches to make 20ch stitches in total.

Row 1: sc into 2nd ch from hook, *ch2, skip 2, sc into next stitch. Repeat from * along row.

Main rows:

Row 2: ch4 (counts as a tr/dc stitch and a ch1), 3tr/dc into ch2 gap, *ch1, 3tr/dc into ch2 gap. Repeat from * along row until final sc remains, ch1, tr/dc into final sc.

Row 3: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) sc into top of tr/dc, sc into ch1 gap, *ch2, sc into ch1 gap. Repeat from *along row, until 1sc remains (this will be the 3rd ch from the ch4 at the start of the previous row) sc into this final stitch.

  • Repeat rows 2 and 3 until you reach the size required.
  • Fasten off and finish off all loose ends.

Crochet How To Guide: Interlocking Block Stitch/ Plaid Stitch

Interlocking block stitch/Plaid stitch is a great stitch to use for blankets, cushions and hats/scarves – you can use as many or as few colours as you wish and come up with some really cool patterns.

I have some patterns which use this stitch including a Plaid effect hat with pom pom and Plaid effect fingerless gloves.

Interlocking block stitch/plaid stitch tutorial:

Notes:

  • Change colour on the last yo of the final stitch of the row.

Starting row:

For the first row you need to ch the length of stitches you require, and as the interlocking block/plaid stitch works in 2 blocks of 3 you need to make sure your starting ch length is dividable by 6. Once you have your ch length add on 5 extra stitches (this will create the first tr/dc stitch of the row, and a block of 3tr/dc to make sure you end the row on a set of 3tr/dc).

For example: if your starting ch was 30ch stitches long, add an extra 5 stitches to make 35ch stitches in total.

Row 1: tr/dc into the 3rd ch from the hook, this gives you the first tr/dc of the row using the extra 2ch stitches added at the start. Next tr/dc into the next 2 stitches, giving you your first block of 3. *ch3, skip 3 stitches, then tr/dc into the next 3 stitches. Repeat from *along the row.

Main Rows:

Row 2: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) sc, ch3, skip 2, 3tr/dc – one into each stitch two rows below *ch3, skip 3, 3tr/dc – one into each stitch two rows below. Repeat from * along row, until 3 stitches remain (the 2tr/dc and ch3 at start of previous row), ch3, skip 2, sc into top of ch3 at start of previous row.

Row 3: ch3 (counts as a stitch) 2tr/dc – one into each stitch two rows below, ch3, skip 3, *3tr/dc – one into each stitch two rows below, ch3, skip 3. Repeat from * along row, until 3 stitches remain, 2tr/dc – one into each stitch two rows below, tr/dc into final stitch (sc from start of previous row).

  • Repeat rows 2 and 3 until you reach the size of blanket you require.
  • Fasten off, Fasten off all loose ends.

How To: Make A Pom Pom

I often get asked how to make a Pom Pom when you don’t have a Pom Pom maker, or if you don’t have a Pom Pom maker for the size you are wanting so I have put together a how to make pom poms in any size.

How to: Make a pom pom

Materials:

  • Wool in your chosen colour(s).
  • Cardboard.
  • Compass/something circular that is the size pom pom you are wanting, and a smaller circular item to draw a smaller circle.
  • Scissors.
  • Darning needle.
  • Pencil.

Step 1: Making the cardboard circles.

  • If using your compass: set it to span half the diameter of the circle you are wanting, then draw 2 circles onto the cardboard. Next make the span of the compass smaller and draw a smaller circle in the middle of the larger circle.
  • If using a circular object, draw around this object to get your circle, then draw around the smaller object for the middle circle.
  • Cut out the two circles and then cut out the smaller middle circle.
  • Stack the two circles together.

Step 2: Wrapping the wool.

  • Using your chosen wool colour: cut a long strand of wool and thread it onto the darning needle, hold the tail end of the wool and wrap the wool around the card board template.
  • Continue to wrap the wool all the way around the cardboard circle – using the darning needle will make it easier towards the end when the middle circle starts to fill up. If you run out of wool, cut another strand and continue, holding the tail of the wool and wrapping around the cardboard.
  • Keep wrapping the wool around until the circle is completely covered and the middle smaller circle is full of wool.

Step 3: Cutting the wool.

  • Cut around the edge of the circle, lining the scissors up in the gap between the two pieces of cardboard.

Step 4: Securing the wool.

  • Cut a piece of wool 20cm long and tie it around the middle of the pom pom in between the two cardboard circles. Tie a knot to secure it, then cut the longer length so it is the same length as the wool in the pom pom.
  • Remove the 2 cardboard circles (you may need to cut them off).

Finished!

Notes:

  • You can make a multicoloured pom pom just by using different wool colours while wrapping the wool around.
  • You can make pumpkin themed pom poms by wrapping green wool only around the top middle section of the cardboard circle, and wrapping orange wool around the rest of the circle.
  • If you want to display some pom poms you can make a ew in different sizes, attach them to fabric and display them in an embroidery hoop.

Crochet How To: The Granny Square, Step By Step Guide

How To Make The Granny Square

Definitely one of my favourite things to make, a Granny square can be used for all sorts of crochet projects, from blankets to cushions to table mats. I often use these on my Minecraft makes as they are perfect for creating the block effect needed.

A giant granny square is a perfect ‘quick make’ blanket – to make one just keep continuing the rounds, change the colour each round or every couple of rounds to add a bit of detail.

How To Make A Basic Granny Square:

To Start:

  • ch5, then slip stitch into the first ch to make a round.

Round 1:

  • ch3, then complete 2 trb into the round, *ch2, then complete 3trb into the round, repeat from * twice more, ch2 then slip stitch into the top of the ch3 at the start.

Round 2:

  • ch3, then complete 2 trb into the corner space, * ch2, then complete 3trb into the corner space, ch2 then 3trb into the same corner space. Repeat from * twice more.
  • Then ch2, 3trb into the corner space, ch2 then slip stitch to the top of the 3ch at the start.

Round 3:

  • ch3, then complete 2trb into the corner space.
  • *ch2, then complete 3trb into the ch2 space, ch2, then complete 3trb into the corner space, ch2 then complete 3trb into the same corner space. Repeat from *twice more.
  • Then ch2 3trb into the 2ch space, ch2 then complete 3trb into the corner space, ch2 then slip stitch into the top of the 3ch at the start.

Round 4:

  • ch3, then complete 2trb into the corner space.
  • *ch2, then complete 3trb into the ch2 space, ch2, then complete 3trb into the next ch2 space, then complete 3trb into the corner space, ch2 then complete 3trb into the same corner space. Repeat from *twice more.
  • Then ch2 3trb into the 2ch space, ch2, 3trb into next 2ch space, ch2 then complete 3trb into the corner space, ch2 then slip stitch into the top of the 3ch at the start.

Crochet How To: Solid Granny Square, Step By Step Guide

A Bit Of Variation On A Traditional Granny Square: A Solid Granny Square

With a little bit of a twist on a traditional Granny square, these solid squares and perfect for when your wanting a more solid block of colour on a blanket/cushion. I find them perfect for my Minecraft makes as they really help each of the blocks stand out.

How To Make A Solid Granny Square:

To Start:

  • ch4 and slip stitch into first dc to make a round.

Round 1:

  • ch5, then 3trb into the round.
  • ch2 3trb into the round twice. ch2, 2trb into the round then slip stitch into the 3rd dc of the ch5 you started with.

Round 2:

  • ch5, 2trb into 2ch space, 3trb, 2trb into 2ch space.
  • *ch2, 2trb into 2ch space, 3trb 2trb into 2ch space, repeat from * once more.
  • ch2 2trb into 2ch space, 3trb, trb into 2ch space, then slip stitch into 3rd ch of the starting 5ch.

Round 3:

  • ch5, 2trb into 2ch space, 7trb, 2trb into 2ch space.
  • *ch2, 2trb into 2ch space, 7trb 2trb into 2ch space, repeat from * once more.
  • ch2 2trb into 2ch space, 7trb, trb into 2ch space, then slip stitch into 3rd ch of the starting 5ch.

Round 4:

  • ch5, 2trb into 2ch space, 7trb, 2trb into 2ch space.
  • *ch2, 2trb into 2ch space, 7trb 2trb into 2ch space, repeat from * once more.
  • ch2 2trb into 2ch space, 7trb, trb into 2ch space, then slip stitch into 3rd ch of the starting 5ch.
  • Fasten off