First a blue, now a green, these Star Wars crochet lightsabers are multiplying quickly

It all started with a blue lightsaber and I decided to make a couple more as I had a couple more handles I wanted to try, now it’s time for a green one.

Green lightsaber pattern 

Materials

4mm hook

DK wool in grey (50g ball)

DK wool in black (50g ball)

DK wool in green (50g ball)

DK wool in brown (25g)

DK wool in gold/yellow (25g)

Needle

Lightsaber handle 

Starting in silver

Make a magic ring, ch1, 6dc into ring

Round 1: 2dc into each dc

Round 3: 2dc into same dc, dc

Round 3: 2dc into same dc, 2dc

Round 4: 2dc into same dc, 3dc

Round 5: dc around into back loop only

Rounds 6-9: dc around

Change to black

Rounds 10-13: dc around

Change to grey

Rounds 14-19: dc around

Change to black

Rounds 20-34: dc around

Change to yellow/gold

Rounds 35-41: dc around

Change to brown

Rounds 42-45: dc around

Change to silver

Rounds 46-52: dc around

Fasten off
Lightsaber silver banding 

1st piece

ch5

Row 1: dc into 2nd ch from hook

Rows 2-35: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) dc along row

Fasten off leaving long thread to attach

2nd piece

ch3

Row 1: dc into 2nd ch from hook

Rows 2-35: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) dc along row

Fasten off leaving long thread to attach

Sew piece 2 onto piece 1
Lightsaber yellow/gold banding 

1st piece

ch4

Row 1: dc into 2nd ch from hook

Rows 2-35: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) dc along row

Fasten off leaving long thread to attach

2nd piece

ch34

Fasten off leaving long thread to attach

Sew piece 2 onto piece 1
Coloured light beam

In green

ch25, slip stitch into first stitch to make a round

Rounds 1-30: dc around

Round 31: dc2tog 4dc, 4 times

Rounds 32-51: dc around

Round 52: dc2tog 3dc, 4 times

Rounds 53-67: dc around

Round 68: dc2tog 2dc, 4 times

Rounds 69-78: dc around

Round 79: dc2tog dc, 4 times

Round 80-81: dc around

Round 82: dc2tog, 4 times

Fasten off leaving long length to attach
To assemble 

-Stuff the handle and the light beam, sew the light beam to the handle. You could also place a cardboard tube into the light beam and handle to make them both stronger and less flexible.

-Sew on the grey band to the top of the lightsaber

-Sew on the yellow/gold band on the yellow/gold section

I am really glad these have worked out well so far and following these successes I still want to make a few more – I’ve already got the next one in mind!

I finally managed to get all the grannies assembled and in their correct positions to finish my Minecraft Ghast blanket! 

Has taken me a little while to get the final few grannies for this ghast blanket finished but I had a little flurry of making them and finally got all 100 finished and sewn together. I love the effect of this granny square and the pattern I used is over on:

http://www.creativejewishmom.com/2012/06/simple-filet-crochet-starburst-square-pattern.html


 It’s been great using different types of granny square for each of the Minecraft blankets I have made so far, (mooshroom cow, creeper) and I have found another one to try for my next Minecraft blanket I have in mind – you would think I would have had enough of these granny squares blankets by now, but I keep finding new grannies and other Minecraft blankets I want to make!

From a mass of 128 paper and fabric triangles emerged this bright and cosy quilt 

A few months ago I was asked by The Craft Cotton company if I would be able to make a patchwork quilt for them using the new Ombre trends range by Heather Jacks. I jumped at the chance to do this, firstly because I enjoy making quilts, second I love the Using The Craft Cotton Company fabrics and finally because I really liked the look of both the patterns and the colours of the new Ombre trends fabric, I couldn’t wait to get started!

I opted to use the English Paper piecing method to make this quilt as I really like using it when making quilts and don’t often get a chance to do it.
I was so pleased with the finale outcome of this blanket and my tutorial for making it is featured over on their blog;
http://craftcottonco.blogspot.co.uk/p/free-patterns.html?m=1

  

Finally took the plunge to try making one of these – a crochet Star Wars lightsaber! 

Since making my crochet R2-D2, I have been thinking about making some crochet lightsabers for a while now but I wasn’t too sure whether I would be able to make something that would look ok. After much deliberation I thought I would give it a go and see what I could come up with. After a while of researching lightsabers (I never realised there were so many different ones!) I got cracking on making the lightsaber using a rough design I sketched up based on some I had seen. After completing it I was very pleased with how it came out, so much so in fact I’ve decided to make a couple of other slightly different ones!

Blue lightsaber 
Materials 

4mm hook

DK wool in grey (50g ball)

DK wool in black (50g ball)

DK wool in blue (50g ball)

DK wool in red (small amount)

Needle

Toy stuffing
Lightsaber handle 

In grey

Make a magic ring, ch1, 6dc into ring

Round 1: 2dc into each dc

Round 2: 2dc into same dc, dc. Repeat around

Round 3: 2dc into same dc, 2dc. Repeat around

Round 4: 2dc into same dc, 3dc. Repeat around

Round 5: dc around into back loop only

Rounds 6-32: dc around

Change to black

Rounds 33-34: dc around

Change to grey

Rounds 35-38: dc around

Fasten off
Lightsaber band

In grey

ch7

Row 1: dc into 2nd ch from hook, dc along rest of the row

Rows 2-36: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) dc along row

Fasten off
Lightsaber band button

In grey

ch6

Row 1: dc into 2nd ch from hook, dc along rest of row

Rows 2-3: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) dc along row

Row 4: dc around the edge (down the side, along the bottom, up the other side, along the top)

Row 5: dc around in back loops only

Fasten off, leaving long length to attach
Red dot 

In red

Make a magic ring, ch1, 6dc into ring

Round 1: 2dc into same dc, dc

Fasten off, leaving long length to attach
Black strips (make 8)

In black

ch11

Row 1: dc into 2nd ch from hook, dc along rest of the row

Row 2: ch1 (doesn’t count as a stitch) dc along row
Coloured light beam 

In blue

ch25, slip stitch into first stitch to make a round

Rounds 1-20: dc around

Round 21: dc2tog 4dc, 4 times, dc

Rounds 22-41: dc around

Round 42: dc2tog 3dc, 4 times, dc

Rounds 43-57: dc around

Round 58: dc2tog 2dc, 4 times, dc

Rounds 59-63: dc around

Round 64: dc2tog dc, 4 times, dc

Round 65-66: dc around

Round 67: dc2tog, 4 times, dc

Fasten off leaving long length to attach


To assemble 

-Stuff the handle and light beam, sew light beam into the handle. You could also place a cardboard tube into the light beam and handle to make them both stronger and less flexible.

-Sew on the red dot

-Sew on the grey band to the handle and sew on the button placing a small amount of stuffing in first



-Sew on the black strips vertically around the handle


-Sew on the light beam


I can’t wait for the weather to improve so I can get this bunting out to brighten up my garden, I hope I won’t be waiting for too long!

Soon as I saw this bird fabric I knew it would be perfect for some bunting I was wanting to make and I paired it with some yellow and red fabric I had already in my stash. I think I have been a bit overly optimistic with making this so early in preparation for hanging outside, I have a feeling I may be impatiently waiting quite a while for the weather to warm up a little more and the rain stop a bit so I can get it outside.  

   
 
Bird bunting
Materials

Fabric in your chosen colours, I used a bird fabric and a yellow and red 

Bias binding 

Pins

Thread

1- Make a template for the bunting 

Cut a paper template out measuring 18×22 cm, or to whatever sized triangle you want.

  

2- Cut out the fabric

Cut out two fabric pieces for each piece of bunting
3- Sewing the bunting

Placing right sides together sew down each side of the bunting, leaving the top unsewn. Turn the right way around. 
4- Sewing the bunting to the binding 

Starting 10cm from the start of the binding, place a piece of bunting into the bias binding so half the binding folds to the back and half to the front and pin. Leave a gap from this piece of bunting, I left 8cm, and then pin the next piece of bunting. Repeat this process until all the bunting pieces are pinned in place then machine sew along the edge of the binding.  

    

5- Finishing the binding 

At the start and end, fold the binding over twice and slip stitch down the edge to secure, this will hide the raw edge.  

   
   

The last pieces have been completed and carefully scuttling its way out of my craft bag is a kiwi bird 

I never thought I would reach the end of these but I have reached the bottom of my craft bag and all the bird parts have been successfully been put together, the last to be completed was this lovely kiwi bird. I have been putting this one off to last as I wasn’t looking forward to adding the feather detail as I thought it would take me forever. However, the time came when I could no longer out it off and couldn’t leave the poor bird bald so I knuckled down to finish it. I was pleasantly surprised that it didn’t take that long to do and I had it finished after 2 evenings – not that speedy I know, but I was expecting a lot worse.  

This bird is from Kerry Lords book, Edwards menagerie: birds.
  
There’s still quite a few birds in the book left I want to make so I’m sure it won’t be long until a couple more appear!